University of Texas School of Law

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Cybersecurity Compliance Trends in 2019 - Why be concerned?

Contains material from Jun 2019

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Over the last six months and into the next six months of this current Congress, there has been an increase in federal and state legislative activity surrounding consumer data privacy and protection. Meanwhile, the FTC has been busy in the background, testifying before house and senate subcommittees, to ask for more enforcement authority and the right to impose civil penalties. Whether all 50 states enact a consumer data privacy law or whether the federal government does so - and preempts them all - ultimately the FTC will likely remain the primary enforcement agency.  Learn, from experts, about some basic steps that all in-house counsel can start taking to make their compliance program ready. Also discuss the most pressing developments from the perspective of legal risk and how to mitigate it. And, you will learn key takeaways for how to operationalize the new requirements to meet business objectives.
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Total Credit Hours:
0.75 | 0.25 ethics     Credit Info

TX MCLE credit expires: 6/30/2020

Includes: Video Audio Paper

$50  

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Credit Hours
1. Cybersecurity Compliance Trends in 2019 - Why be concerned? (Jun 2019)

James E. Elliott, Ryan Lobato, Ryan T. Sulkin

0.75 0.25 0.00 0.75 | 0.25 ethics  

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Video (mp4) 46 mins
Audio (mp3) 45 mins
Paper (pdf) 36 pgs
Paper (pdf) 17 pgs

SESSION 1 — 46 mins, credit 0.75 | 0.25 ethics

Session 1:

Cybersecurity Compliance Trends in 2019 - Why be concerned? (Jun 2019)

Over the last six months and into the next six months of this current Congress, there has been an increase in federal and state legislative activity surrounding consumer data privacy and protection. Meanwhile, the FTC has been busy in the background, testifying before house and senate subcommittees, to ask for more enforcement authority and the right to impose civil penalties. Whether all 50 states enact a consumer data privacy law or whether the federal government does so - and preempts them all - ultimately the FTC will likely remain the primary enforcement agency.  Learn, from experts, about some basic steps that all in-house counsel can start taking to make their compliance program ready. Also discuss the most pressing developments from the perspective of legal risk and how to mitigate it. And, you will learn key takeaways for how to operationalize the new requirements to meet business objectives.

Originally presented at: May 2019 Technology Law Conference

James E. Elliott, Federal Trade Commission - Dallas, TX
Ryan Lobato, Exxon Mobil Corp. - Houston, TX
Ryan T. Sulkin, Michael Best & Freidrich LLP - Chicago, IL