University of Texas School of Law

eCourse

eSupplement to the 2019 Conference on Criminal Appeals

Contains material from Dec 2017 to Dec 2018

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Session 1: Greed...for Lack of a Better Word...is[n't] Good - Using a series of case studies, explore the ethical obligations and fiduciary duties owed by lawyers to clients and how the Texas Disciplinary Rules of Professional Conduct, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, and the Texas Rules of Civil Procedure are implicated in each.

Session 2: ​Deep Ethics: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Internet The work tools in the modern law office now consist of a networked ecosystem of distractions, and our default method of use may be harmful to us and degrade the value we can bring to clients. Change the way you use these tools to preserve wellness and protect your ability to engage in deep, linear, creative thinking.

Session 3: Dealing with Bad Facts Every case has bad facts, some to a greater degree. The opponent always has points to make. Filing for a motion in limine is the first line of defense, but if that fails or there is no legitimate argument to exclude the bad evidence, what do you do? Investigate whether it is best to deal with bad facts only after the opponent introduces them, or if it is better to “inoculate” the jury against negative effects by introducing them first in a weakened form.
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Total Credit Hours:
2.25 | 1.50 ethics     Credit Info

TX MCLE credit expires: 2/29/2020

Includes: Video Audio Paper Slides

$105  

Preview Sessions
Credit Hours
1. Greed...for Lack of a Better Word...is[n't] Good (Dec 2018)

F. Daniel Knight

1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 | 1.00 ethics  

Preview Session Materials

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for offline use.

Video (mp4) 57 mins
Paper (pdf) 10 pgs
Slides (pdf) 2 pgs

SESSION 1 — 57 mins, credit 1.00 | 1.00 ethics

Session 1:

Greed...for Lack of a Better Word...is[n't] Good (Dec 2018)

Using a series of case studies, explore the ethical obligations and fiduciary duties owed by lawyers to clients and how the Texas Disciplinary Rules of Professional Conduct, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, and the Texas Rules of Civil Procedure are implicated in each.

Originally presented at: Dec 2018 Greed...for Lack of a Better Word...is[n't] Good

F. Daniel Knight, Chamberlain, Hrdlicka, White, Williams & Aughtry - Houston, TX

2. ​Deep Ethics: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Internet (Jul 2018)

Kendall M. Gray

0.50 0.50 0.00 0.50 | 0.50 ethics  

Preview Session Materials

You may download session materials
for offline use.

Video (mp4) 29 mins
Audio (mp3) 29 mins
Paper (pdf) 34 pgs

SESSION 2 — 29 mins, credit 0.50 | 0.50 ethics

Session 2:

​Deep Ethics: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Internet (Jul 2018)

The work tools in the modern law office now consist of a networked ecosystem of distractions, and our default method of use may be harmful to us and degrade the value we can bring to clients. Change the way you use these tools to preserve wellness and protect your ability to engage in deep, linear, creative thinking.

Originally presented at: Jun 2018 Conference on State and Federal Appeals

Kendall M. Gray, Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP - Houston, TX

3. Dealing with Bad Facts (Dec 2017)

Quentin Brogdon

0.75 0.00 0.00 0.75  

Preview Session Materials

You may download session materials
for offline use.

Video (mp4) 44 mins
Audio (mp3) 44 mins
Paper (pdf) 21 pgs
Slides (pdf) 26 pgs

SESSION 3 — 44 mins, credit 0.75

Session 3:

Dealing with Bad Facts (Dec 2017)

Every case has bad facts, some to a greater degree. The opponent always has points to make. Filing for a motion in limine is the first line of defense, but if that fails or there is no legitimate argument to exclude the bad evidence, what do you do? Investigate whether it is best to deal with bad facts only after the opponent introduces them, or if it is better to “inoculate” the jury against negative effects by introducing them first in a weakened form.

Originally presented at: Nov 2017 Civil Litigation Conference

Quentin Brogdon, Crain Lewis Brogdon, LLP - Dallas, TX