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Parallel Civil and Criminal Proceedings

Contains material from Jun 2020

Parallel Civil and Criminal Proceedings
4.29 out of 5 stars
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Very informative

Overall very good. Would have appreciated some tax-specific case cites. Idea for future presentation- parallel proceedings and fifth amendment issue in federal tax cases

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Parallel criminal and civil cases arising out of the same event occur with some frequency. Join Quentin Brogdon as he explores several issues: whether the civil case must be abated, until the criminal case is resolved, or if the cases may proceed simultaneously. Potential consequences of the assertion of the fifth amendment privilege against self-incrimination, and potential effects of differences in the scope of discovery in the civil case and the scope of discovery in the parallel criminal case.

Includes: Video Paper Slides

  • Total Credit Hours:
  • 1.00
  • Credit Info
  • TX, CA
  • TX MCLE credit expires: 6/30/2021

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1. Parallel Civil and Criminal Proceedings (Jun 2020)

Quentin Brogdon

1.00 0.00 0.00 1.00
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(mp4)
60 mins
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12 pgs
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30 pgs
Session 1 — 60 mins, credit 1.00
Parallel Civil and Criminal Proceedings (Jun 2020)

Parallel criminal and civil cases arising out of the same event occur with some frequency. Join Quentin Brogdon as he explores several issues: whether the civil case must be abated, until the criminal case is resolved, or if the cases may proceed simultaneously. Potential consequences of the assertion of the fifth amendment privilege against self-incrimination, and potential effects of differences in the scope of discovery in the civil case and the scope of discovery in the parallel criminal case.
 

Originally presented at: Jun 2020 Parallel Civil and Criminal Proceedings

Quentin Brogdon, Crain Brogdon Rogers, LLP - Dallas, TX

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