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eCourse

Communication with Opposing Counsel and Landowners

Contains material from Apr 2020

Communication with Opposing Counsel and Landowners
4.15 out of 5 stars
What was the overall quality of the course (presentation, materials, and technical delivery)?
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very detailed, but very good

Overall it was a good discussion on real problems that create ethics issues.

Very informative and applicable to all sorts of transactional situations. Thanks!

I thought this was a very useful presentation and look forward to reading the paper

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Common law rules, the fields of tort and contract, as well as rules of professional ethics, govern a lawyer’s or landman’s negotiations on behalf of a client.  By remaining mindful of these rules, including how the rules differ depending on whether you are negotiating with opposing counsel or a landowner, you can stay out of trouble and better serve your client.

Includes: Video Audio Paper Slides

  • Total Credit Hours:
  • 0.75 | 0.75 ethics
  • Credit Info
  • TX, CA
  • Specialization: Administrative Law | Oil, Gas and Mineral Law | Real Estate Law
  • TX MCLE credit expires: 4/30/2021

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Preview Sessions
Credit

1. Communication with Opposing Counsel and Landowners (Apr 2020)

Keith B. Hall

0.75 0.75 0.00 0.75 | 0.75 ethics
Preview Materials

Download session materials for offline use

(mp4)
46 mins
(mp3)
46 mins
(pdf)
30 pgs
(pdf)
30 pgs
Session 1 — 46 mins, credit 0.75 | 0.75 ethics
Communication with Opposing Counsel and Landowners (Apr 2020)

Common law rules, the fields of tort and contract, as well as rules of professional ethics, govern a lawyer’s or landman’s negotiations on behalf of a client.  By remaining mindful of these rules, including how the rules differ depending on whether you are negotiating with opposing counsel or a landowner, you can stay out of trouble and better serve your client.

Originally presented at: Mar 2020 Fundamentals of Oil, Gas and Mineral Law

Keith B. Hall, Louisiana State University Paul M. Hebert Law Center - Baton Rouge, LA

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